Headfirst into Rust - Throttle and Mutability

In the first iteration of my Throttle, I packaged the state of the throttle into a Cell so that an otherwise immutable throttle could still function.

pub struct Throttle<TArg> {
  delay_calculator: Box<Fn(TArg, Duration) -> Duration + Send + Sync>,
  state: Cell<ThrottleState>
}

This has the interesting side effect of making the throttle unsafe in threaded environments. Two threads could attempt to mutate the state at the same time, which would have undefined results.

Fishing for opinions, the suggestion to use an RwLock to control access to the Cell came up. The implication being that, if two threads try to modify the state of a throttle at the same time, then the second thread to do so will spin wait until the throttle becomes available again. This is acceptable behavior, since the throttle may just wait that thread again anyway as soon as it acquires the lock.

Looking at RwLock, however, it is not a happy story. Getting a lock may fail and that requires propagating that failure to the caller. This would make the implementation for acquire look something like the following:

impl <TArg> Throttle<TArg> {
  pub fn acquire(&self, arg: TArg): LockResult { ... }
}

Callers would have to match on the result or call unwrap on the result to determine if there was an error or not, which is more complicated than I want the API to be in its most basic case.

In my opinion, how to handle concurrency failures is not a concern of the throttle, so instead I chose to make the throttle itself mutable.

pub struct Throttle<TArg> {
  delay_calculator: Box<Fn(TArg, Duration) -> Duration + Send + Sync>,
  state: ThrottleState
}

impl <TArg> Throttle<TArg> {
  pub fn acquire(&mut self, arg: TArg) { ... }
}

Rust's borrow checker forces the caller to handle thread safety (or unsafety), in a way that is most sensible to the caller. In the simple case: there is only a single thread, so the API remains clean of any concurrency; in the complex case: the consumer can use whatever concurrency methods are necessary.

In the future I think it would be wise to refactor this down into a trait for Throttles, with specializations for different kinds of throttling - simple throttles, closure-controlled throttles, threadsafe closure-controlled throttles, throttle-buckets, threadsafe throttle buckets, and so on. But as I iteratively dive deeper into the Rust language, such things are fun thoughts that can stand to be pondered a while longer.